Category: Reviews

Prime Viewing: Ronja, The Robber’s Daughter

Much in the vein of our Netflix Hidden Gem series, this week I’m branching out to include Amazon Prime. Why you may ask? Simple. I want to talk about Studio Ghibli!

Ronja, The Robber’s Daughter (Netflix Original, Studio Ghibli)

Based on Astrid Lindgren’s novel, this series tells the coming of age of Ronja, the only daughter of a robber chief growing up in medieval Scandinavia. When Ronja becomes old enough to explore the forest on her own, she discovers that a rival robber clan and their young son are living quite close by. The two strike up a friendship, regardless of their parents’ wishes.

Photo: Amazon, Studio Ghibli

I was very excited when I heard that Ghibli was going to be releasing this series on Amazon and I started watching it not long after it was available. But here it is almost 2 months later and I’m only just getting around to talking about it. This is because it took me a long time to both finish watching it and even longer to decide how I felt about it. So, for the sake of this review, I’m going to simplify things. For better or worse, here’s what I thought. Spoiler alert: it’s kinda a mixed bag.
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Strong Female Zombies: More Than One Way to Eat the Living

I’ve been writing a lot about zombies lately, so I was going to change it up this month and write about some great comics I’ve been reading. But then I read this strange review of the new Netflix Original Series, Santa Clarita Diet, (SCD) from Esquire by a woman named Katie Van Brunt, and frankly, it demanded a response.
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Review: Mockingbird Vol. 1

Talking about feminism can be a complex issue. Over the years, there have been different definitions and movements, but put most simply it can be distilled down to the belief in equality between men and women and the rights that go along with it. It’s not a new concept, and it serves as a backbone for the very blog you are reading right now. So when an author is harassed off Twitter for writing a character who wears an “Ask Me About My Feminist Agenda” t-shirt on the cover, I made it a point to not only read Chelsea Cain’s Mockingbird comic, but to also review it for you guys.

I don’t want to spend a lot of time focusing on the Twitter incident, except to take pleasure in the amount of support Cain received from the comics community. It brought a lot of attention to a book that in many ways had been under the radar. As a result, it shot to number one on Amazon and I got to discover one of the most unusual books I have read in a long time.

Mokingbird Vol 1

Copyright Marvel

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Sexual awakening in ‘Chewing Gum’ is hilarious, awkward, relatable

[Updated January 9, 2017]

By Aayesha Siddiqui

Chewing Gum will have you laughing, squirming, and nodding in that “Yeah, I know how that goes” kind of way. The comedy — created by, written by, and starring Michaela Coel — follows Tracey, a 24-year-old woman discovering how awesome and awkward sex can be.

The 6-episode first season originally premiered on the BBC’s channel E4 in October 2015. Thankfully, Netflix brought the show to U.S. audiences in the fall of 2016. Season two premieres on E4 this January (watch the trailer).

I stumbled across the series while browsing Netflix, and I quickly binged all of season one. Here are my top 3 reasons why Chewing Gum should be next on your list.

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3 Christmas Scares

Confession time. I’m not a huge Christmas person. I like it fine; I’m not full-on a Grinch, but I don’t get overly excited about it. That said, there are a few traditions I enjoy, like cookie decorating, a yearly trip to to get my Drink on, and less-christmasy Christmas movies (it’s kinda like how I don’t care about sports but like movies about sports—eh, go fig). By this I mean movies where the holidays are in the background, not the main focus. I’m sure most of you know some of the more popular less-christmasy Christmas movies like Die Hard, Gremlins, and The Ref. In these movies, Christmas is the background character rather than the star.

This year, while we trimmed the tree (and yes, I do insist on a real tree because having a tree inside your home is cool), I suggested we delve a little deeper into the less-christmasy Christmas genre and watch Christmas horror! Am I a little one note? Maybe. But I watched these movies partially for you too, in the spirit of giving! So, get your eggnog or mulled wine, and buckle up those sleigh bells ’cause it’s gonna be a bumpy ride.

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October is for Horror II: 3 Netflix Hidden Gems

As the Ladies’ resident expert of movies and shows involving blood splatter, and since I did one of these posts last year, I decided now was a good time to prowl through Netflix for 3 more hidden gems to help get you into the mood for the best, or at least the spookiest (spoopiest?) month of the year.  This time around I am going for a bit more variety, rather than just 3 straight horror movies.  Think of them as choices in the spirit of trick-or-treating.  Not one wants a bag full of just one kind of candy.

Tucker and Dale vs. Evil

td-tucker-dale-evilI love a good horror comedy, but it’s a tough genre to do really well.  For me it works best when there’s a real love and understanding of what is at the root of some standard horror tropes.  Movies like Shaun of the Dead, Cabin in the Woods, and Zombieland do this particularly well. Enter Tucker and Dale vs. Evil with its flipped around take on the “backwoods murder hillbilly” trope.  Frankly I think it’s more fun to go into the movie with less knowledge of the plot so I’m not going to give you much on purpose. I didn’t read any summaries myself and that made each reveal more fun.   Plus, it stars Allen Tudyk, who is just a delight in  his role. A word to the squeamish: while this movie is surely considered a comedy, it’s also pretty gory.  If that’s not your thing, this isn’t for you.   Note: It’s been reported that a sequel to this 2010 original is in the works.  After enjoying this one so much I’m excited to see where these characters will go next.

4 out of 5 bodies through a woodchipper

Extraordinary Tales

td-extraordinary-talesWait, what?  Tiny Doom is going to write something about an animated thing?  Yeah guys, I am, I’ve got layers.  Well, it’s an animated thing with blood splatter so I guess I’m not really going too far off task here. Curated by veteran Disney animator and Spanish writer-director Raul Garcia,   Extraordinary Tales is an animated anthology of 5 tales by Edgar Allen Poe.  We are talking about some pretty time-honored Halloween fare.  Each tale has its own animation style, and the voice talent (ranging from Christopher Lee  – in one of his last projects before his death, Bela Lugosi, and Julian Sands) makes this an almost hypnotic watch.  It’s not scary so much as it satisfies a craving for the Gothic and the creepy. It’s probably best viewed in the evening or on a dreary afternoon.

3.5 out of 5 red death masques

The Awakening

td-awakeningThey had me at “lady ghost debunker” with this one.  A BBC film, The Awakening is a period piece in which that invokes both horror and mystery tropes.  Florence Cathcart uses science to expose charlatans and debunk claims of haunting.  However, each time she succeeds at her task it’s a bit heartbreaking because she is also hoping for evidence of the supernatural so that she can contact her partner who was lost in the war. Think, the Houdinis.  When she gets called to a case in a boy’s boarding school more is revealed about her past, including some memories she buried regarding her upbringing.  This movie is a slow burn of creepiness, with some big reveals at the end. I found the ending to be sort of ambiguous and sort of not, but I think it leaves things open enough that if you want to believe, you can.  If you liked The Woman in Black, you might like this.

3.5 out of 5 creepy British boarding school kids

Review: Agents of the Realm

LadiesCon 2016 may be over, but we’re still thinking about what made it such a great time. One of the things that I was really excited about was the opportunity to speak directly to so many creators and artists about their original works. One of the creators I was most excited about was Mildred Louis, who writes and draws a comic called Agents of the Realm. I hadn’t heard of her work before the con, but when she contacted us about having a table, I looked at her work and knew I’d be paying her a visit. I had the supreme good fortune (thanks to a huge assist from Smalerie) of snagging the last copy of her book, which collects the first volume of an ambitious work which, luckily for me, continues online.

Transformation

Transformation

 

The premise is a twist on the classic magical girl genre of manga (see Crystal Cadets for a more standard version): five young women discover that they are the protectors of our world, which is being threatened by strange beasts entering our realm from a sister dimension. In the classic magical girl style, Norah, Adele, Kendall, Paige, and Jordan have special brooches that transform them into uniform-wearing warriors, each with her own weapon, powers, and attendant element. Through the magic of the brooches, they find each other and begin to learn about their powers, the other realm, and why and how they were chosen to protect the world.

The twist comes in from the fact that in standard magical girl stories, there is an emphasis on girl – the protagonists are typically tweens or young teenagers, and part of the transformation is that they become an adult version of themselves. They’re all Mary Marvel, if her posse were other girls instead of two boys and talking tiger. The Agents are all adults already – young adults, to be fair, but in college and of legal age. This immediately has different implications about how they make the choice to accept their roles and for how Louis is able to explore the relationships between the characters and the problems that they face. When you’re watching or reading Sailor Moon, you know that while Sailor Moon is presented as an adult, Usagi Tsukino is really still a kid, and her concerns when she isn’t saving the planet are appropriately childish. The Agents, on the other hand, are young adults, and they have concerns that an adult can relate to, in addition to fighting off giant spirit birds.

Another thing that makes the series great is the level of representation of both people of color and of LBGTQ folks. Most of the characters, including 4 of the 5 Agents, are not white. They also have a wide range of body types  – and they keep them after they transform. They do not become “idealized” versions of themselves. This is a powerful message delivered with subtlety – that they are already good enough, already powerful just as they are. They are also beautiful, and feminine, without needing to all fit into the white, western ideal shape.

The team.

The orientations of the various characters are handled with that same grace – we’re shown characters who have loving relationships of all types, completely integrated into the story. It doesn’t feel like anything that’s being called attention to, a lesson we’re meant to learn – these are just people, and people have many different approaches to sex and love and romance.

Norah, Adele, Kendall, Paige, and Jordan feel like real people – they have strengths, but also flaws – and not just “oh, she’s such a klutz.” It’s apparent even in the first issue that Norah struggles with social anxiety. Paige is driven and ambitious to the point of being rude at times. Kendall is a peacemaker. It’s refreshing to see the trope of the “chosen ones” applied to characters who feel like more than a cardboard cutout.

Finally, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the art. As you can see from the pictures here, it’s gorgeous and dynamic. There’s a clear progression as Louis’ style evolves – I think that she continually improves her panel layout and visual storytelling  – but the technical excellence is on display from the beginning.

Do you read Agents of the Realm? Tell me what you think in the comments!

Kickass Ladies, for sure.

Recommended age: Teen to adult. The content is far from racy, but the website does have a trigger warning that suggests that not all of it might be suitable for younger readers.

You might like it if: You like realistic ladies kicking fantastical butt.

Bonus features: If you’re local, Mildred Louis will be at MICE!  So if you missed getting a physical book at LadiesCon, you might have another shot.

LadiesCon Guest Spotlight: Ming Doyle

As LadiesCon draws ever-closer, we here at the Ladies are working to find ways to make an enjoyable experience for everyone involved. We’ve split up into two locations – vendors and guests at 212 Elm Street, and panels and programs at Comicazi. (They’re  only a 5 minute walk away from each other, never fear!) We’ve added pre-event lunches and after parties. And of course, we’ve been working on these posts to showcase our exceptional inaugural guests! This week we’re featuring multi-talented Ming Doyle.

Menace and magic.

Menace and magic.

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LadiesCon Guest Spotlight: Erica Henderson

The word is out about LadiesCon and the buzz around this little event is deafening.  Happily, we have our amazing guests to thank for a large part of that.  This week, I am not only hoping to keep the momentum going, but to also take the chance to highlight one of guests – The Unbeatable Erica Henderson.

fight

Nowadays Erica’s name is pretty much synonymous with Squirrel Girl.

At first my intention when creating this Spotlight Post was to provide as much information I could find about the woman herself.  I would write about how she grew up in New York, attended RISD, and was pretty much destined for greatness.  The problem is that I kept getting distracted.  I found myself poring through her Tumblr and Twitter posts just taking in her art as much as possible.  You see, I’m not much of an artist myself.  So when I try to explain how incredible it is to have Erica as a guest at LadiesCon, it is not because I can tell you that her style is influenced by this or that artist or that her line work is a marvel.  Instead, I can tell you that I am sitting at my kitchen table, literally surrounded by my own collection of her books, and damn…it has been quite a year for her –  drawing Squirrel Girl and Jughead, attending San Diego Comicon, receiving an Eisner Nomination, curating an astounding collection of squirrel-related collectibles, and even dead lifting over 175 lbs.  Erica Henderson is a star. Continue reading

Rotten Roots Review & Ladies at Boston Comic Con 2016

Once again the Ladies of Comicazi will be joining the talented crew of Bad Kids Press at their table at Boston Comic Con this year. We’ll be helping to sell books prints, and other fun goodies, so be sure to stop by, say hello, and consider picking up a few excellent independent comics. Not sure what to pick up? Well, they’re all great! We’ve reviewed The Adventures of the GWF  and Rapid City: Below Zero on the site in the past (hint, click the links to refresh your memories), and today I’ll tell you all about Rotten Roots.

I always feel like, somebody's watching me...

I always feel like, somebody’s watching me…

Written by Paul Axel and with art by Renee Majkut, Rotten Roots is the tale of the prominent Wood family of Osprey City, Massachusetts and the tragedy that hangs over them.

Part historical fiction, part police procedural, the story follows Detective Mark Robles, who’s recently transferred to Osprey City from Chicago. He catches a pretty unusual case – Harold Wood, captain of industry and patriarch of one of the founding families of Osprey City, is found dead with rope burns around his neck and the diary of his ancestor, Daniel Wood, open before him. Also found at the scene is a note inscribed “Rotten roots bear rotten fruit.” Robles quickly figures out that someone has it out for the Wood family – and wants to use their shady history to wreak vengeance on the entire extended Wood clan.

The story moves between past and present, weaving the modern mystery deftly into the tales of the Wood family’s historical misdeeds. Along with the main mystery are hints that there are other secrets to uncover in Osprey City: Why did Detective Robles transfer there? What happened to his family? And why does the Lieutenant hate him so much? It’s clear that these other outlying mysteries will come into play as the drama unfolds.

Majkut’s dreamy watercolors suit the story well, particularly in the gorgeous maps of the city found in the backs of each book. The maps progress as the tale does, beginning with the Puritan settlement and presumably moving into the present day. It’s clear that careful thought has been put into the world-building by the creative team. Majkut’s backgrounds and detail work are also top notch, as evidenced by the final shot of book two, a real stunner.

See? Chills.

See? Chills.

My review is of the first 3 books of a planned 6 issue series, and it ended on a major cliffhanger, so I’m looking forward to seeing where it all leads (I have my suspects, of course, as any true mystery fan does.) Overall, this is a strong start to a series, and I can’t wait to see where it goes.

Recommended for: History buffs, mystery buffs, anyone who wants to see what comics can do outside of superheroes and sci fi

The majestic osprey himself.

The majestic osprey himself.

And now, the moment you’ve all been waiting for – a chance to win tickets to Boston Comic Con. The lucky winner will get a pair of day passes – we recommend coming on Sunday, for our panel on Food and Fandom at 1 pm! Whatever day you choose, come find us at the Bad Kids Press tables, E1000-1003 in Artists Alley.

Speaking of Bad Kids Press, take a gander at their shop. Tell us which title you’re most interested in checking out or artist you’d like to meet in the comments below, and we’ll pick our lucky winner. Good luck!

Oh, and hey, are you watching the “Secret Worlds of Boston Comic Con” webseries? It features some familiar faces, places, and a great host in Wes Hazard. Don’t miss it!