LadyCentric Reviews: The Killing Joke (Part 2)

This is part 2 of my review of the new DC animated film of Alan Moore’s The Killing Joke.  If you are looking for part one, you can find it here.

Part 2: Mark Hamill is a National Treasure

If you read the first half of my Killing Joke review, you will have learned that I am not a huge fan of the original comic.  I am, however, an INSANE fan of Mark Hamill’s performance as the Joker.  No seriously, if I had the means, I would hire him to sit at my desk and read selected emails from my work clients aloud.  I just know that those automatic system reminders and employment verification requests could be so much more nuanced with the right delivery and some maniacal laughter thrown in.  But I digress.  Back to the film.

We last left off with Barbara hanging up her cowl and the movie has now switched its focus to the actual source material for which it is named.  Or at least it will once it pushes through a rather clunky transition where Batman is brought in to investigate some bodies that turned out to be victims of the Joker a couple years earlier.  For some strange reason, these few bodies drives Batman to ask Gordon for access to visit Arkham and confront Joker face to face.  Now this might sound nit-picky, but I always believed that the comic took place later in Batman’s career.  And that he is tired, worn, and that this was a long time coming.  However, in the film it doesn’t feel that way at all.  We were so focused on Barbara that this sudden need for Batman to have a heart to heart with the Joker kinda comes out of left field.  Why now?  I mean sure, we get a lot of “this can only end in us killing each other” and all that stuff, but without a prior knowledge of Batman in general, it feels forced and almost jarring.  For a guy who had little to say to Barbara after sleeping with her, he sure is chatty now.

Joker1

Because I love me some side-by-side comparisons!

From this point forward, I don’t think it makes a lot of sense to hash through the plot.  Most of us are pretty familiar with it anyway.  The screenplay doesn’t add much additional filler from this point on.  In fact, it is one of the most faithful adaptations of a graphic novel I have seen perhaps since the original Sin City film.  I do have to give credit where credit is due because this is where the film truly delivers.

Take a look for yourself:

ha

It is also in the second half of the film that we finally hit some emotional notes.  Aside from the fact that no one (and I mean no one) can Joker monologue like he does, Hamill’s portrayal of the Joker’s life before he hit that tank of acid is compelling to watch.  The characterization Hamill gives us is a complicated one.  While we feel for this unnamed struggling comedian, you can’t help but see moments that make us a little uneasy.  His voice is softer and almost meek at times but builds and becomes more familiar as he struggles with his own feelings of failure.  Is this guy all there?  Does he really have his family’s best interest at heart? Or is there something darker lurking under the surface?  And just what needs to happen to finally push a person over the edge of reason and humanity?  Here in the film is where we really start to see the examination of what madness is.  And that is what The Killing Joke is famous for.  This is worth a watch, if nothing else.

As I try to sum up this review, I really find myself torn.  The easy answer for me would be to suggest that everyone skip the first half and just watch the second, but that feels unfair and frustrating.  I wanted Barbara to have her chance to be more than a object to drive the story line, more than a woman whose fate it determined by the men around her.  I didn’t get that at all.  But the second half of the film still managed to pull me in.  The animation and the performances are just that solid.  And you can’t deny that no matter how you feel about this story, it is iconic and will continue to be included in conversations about Batman’s mythos for years to come.

So I guess this is when I turn things over to you guys.  Did you see it?  If so, what did you think?  Not going to see it, why not?

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